Canal Street in the 1880s: Ginger Liz, Cockney Jim and Dirty Alf

In the 1880s the Manchester Evening News published a series of articles which were then gathered together in a book called “Criminal Manchester.” One chapter is “Canal Street: Ginger Liz and Cockney Alf.”

You can download a PDF of the whole book here, courtesy of Chetham’s Library.

And here’s Chapter X about Canal Street:

CRIMINAL MANCHESTER

EXPERIENCES OF A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

Reprinted from the Manchester Evening News

CHAPTER X.

CANAL-STREET : GINGER LIZ AND COCKNEY JIM.

I have described the life that hides itself in Charter-street, Deansgate, and Gaythorn, and in this, my concluding article, I shall cover the remaining ground that can properly be dealt with, though it is scarcely so prolific as the districts that have already been under notice.

Its area is much wider, however, though its special criminality is decidedly of an inferior order, and is so scattered that it loses much of the dangerous character which is developed when its component parts are comprehensively grouped together. It has many features peculiarly its own, and as it consists of three detached localities, these features are pretty distinctly marked in each. The districts are Canal-street, Ancoats, and London-road. (more…)

 

Manchester Pride delays release of charity figure following protest (video)

Download: large (832×468/mp4) | small (320×180/mp4). Suitable for mobile or if you can’t view above.

“Manchester Pride you’re a disgrace, come down here and show your face!” This was the chant on Monday lunchtime (11 Nov) on Portland Street.

About 20 members of the LGBT community gathered to demand answers from Manchester Pride, whose offices are on the ninth floor of the Manchester One tower.

Despite a range of longstanding campaign issues about fences, exclusion and ticket prices, the most pressing concern on this occasion was the money raised from last summer’s Manchester Pride. The organisation is a registered charity

Tony Cooper, the Manager of Via and a former Deputy Chair of the Village Business Association is one of the business people who expected a fundraising total to be announced last Friday, but it never came.

He wasn’t at the protest, but blasted Pride in a public statement last week, writing “I love Manchester Pride and have attended every one but what I am hearing and seeing now is beyond worrying.”

Over the weekend rumours swirled that, despite the usual near £1 million income, the charity money had hit rock bottom. Somewhere in the region of £20,000 to £29,000. The lowest amount since the event was a jumble sale on the cobbles of Canal Street more than 20 years ago, if true. And protest plans were drawn up.

While local radio reporters conducted interviews among the protesters, village stalwart Julia Grant ‘phoned the Pride office. But the staff weren’t answering and she was directed straight to voicemail. She left a message and later said she was “disgusted.”

“At the end of the day they’re working for the community running Pride. We’ve asked how much was raised. They’re just making it more and more awkward for themselves.”

After an hour, the protesters walked the short distance to the town hall. Finding Albert Square fenced off as the Christmas market was put in place, they decided to occupy the reception area.

One banner that was waved carried the message “our Pride charity is not your tourist cash cow.” A reference to claims published by Manchester Council that Pride generates up to £22 million of economic benefit for the city each year.

The Council’s grant to Pride has been cut to just over £11,000 — about one third of what it used to be. Inevitably campaigners point to the £425,000 that the Council paid towards a brief Alicia Keys concert in 2012.

Later, Manchester Pride announced that the charity amount now won’t be made public until December. But will the gay community be willing be wait that long?

Thanks to photographer Paul Jones for the black and white photo included in the video. You can see more of his work on Flickr.

Sign the petition

Board of Manchester Pride, Manchester City Council & Manchester Police: We the undersigned demand a public meeting over the conduct and future of Manchester Pride

Technical: Panasonic HDC-SD80 camcorder, edited with Sony Vegas Pro 10, encoded with XMediaRecode and MetaDataMover.

 

Fireworks at the HIV Candlelight Vigil 2013, Manchester (video)

Fireworks at the end of the HIV Candlelight Vigil in Sackville ParkThe HIV Candlelight Vigil ended with fireworks on Monday 26 August 2013. Filmed from a tall building to the south of the city centre. A larger sized version of this wil be put up on the website in due course.

Technical: Canon 600D DSLR, Zoom H2 audio recorder, edited with Sony Vegas Pro 10, encoded with XMediaRecode and MetaDataMover.

 

Police With Pride (audio)

My audio recording of the Police With Pride discussion event. It happened on Wednesday 21 August 2013 at Manchester Town Hall and the the subject was relations between police and the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans communities.

Police With pride discussion at Manchester Town Hall, 21 August 2013Police With Pride discussion at Manchester Town Hall, 21 August 2013

On the panel were:

* Greater Manchester Police and Crime Commissioner Tony Lloyd
* Paul Martin, chief executive, The Lesbian and Gay Foundation
* Councillor Sue Murphy, deputy leader, Manchester City Council
* Assistant Chief Constable Garry Shewan, Greater Manchester Police
* Inspector Emma Taylor, Greater Manchester Police

The discussion was chaired by Smyth Harper, Head of Press and Media at Manchester City Council.

It’s in three parts. Total running time: 1 hour 48 mins. This was recorded with my (high quality) portable recorder at the side of the room. However Gaydio intends to broadcast its own recording of the event at some date in the future and no doubt that will be better quality. So listen now or wait: your choice.

Part one

Part two

Part three

 
 

Unexpected early closing at LIDL, Rusholme

LIDL, Wilmslow Road, Rusholme

With a new Morrisons about to open next door you might think that LIDL would be keen to look after its existing customers? Not so… On Tuesday evening the Rusholme branch shop closed two hours early.

In the minute I was outside a series of disappointed shoppers arrived to find a notice about undertaking improvements. And, in my case, the patronising marketing speak about extending the refrigerators so they could “stock even more tasty products” just served to heighten the annoyance.

Why not pay the staff overtime and do it after normal closing, as other shops seem to do?

I’ve been buying more from ALDI recently. The meat, fruit and veg are better, with a greater number of staff on the tills. I wonder how many people feel the same way?

 

Another fire on Oldham Street (video)

Two 15-year-old girls have been arrested on suspicion of manslaughter after a fire in an Oldham Street shop yesterday. A fire-fighter died and another was injured as eight crews tackled the blaze.

It broke out in the storeroom of Paul’s Hair and Beauty World near the Piccadilly end of the street.

This is the third major fire in the Northern Quarter this year and the second on Oldham Street. In April an art-deco former department store caught alight and was so badly damaged that it had to be demolished and last month a fire at the Almost Famous burger restaurant on High Street caused the roof to collapse.

The timelapse video shows smoke rising from the scene at around 22:30 last night.

While the loss of buildings comes second to people, it’s sad to see another attractive frontage on this street damaged and perhaps facing demolition.