Tag Archives: money


How submitting your video content to the BBC could cost you money

Quality content and creativity are valuable things. If you need proof, just look at the millions of pounds that businesses earn from back catalogues of music, films, TV shows and news footage.


Questions that Manchester Pride, Marketing Manchester & the Manchester Evening News don’t want to answer

On 18 August 2006 I wrote to Manchester Pride with the following questions. I received a reply from Marketing Manchester, saying that I would get a ‘prompt reply’ just as soon as Pride was over. More than two months later I am still waiting… Here is my letter:

An inconvenient truth: Gay Manchester was better 20 years ago

I get tired of newspaper articles that make out that the gay 'scene' in Manchester used to be so seedy and bad years ago, but now it is so wonderful. It just isn't true. Take this article from 2003 which appeared in The Manchester Evening News -- a newspaper that can be relied on to […]

Greg Palast on ‘The Fear Factory’

I’m going to tell you something which is straight-up heresy: America is not under attack by terrorists. There is no WAR on terror… Greg Palast on why fear sells better than sex and how The War on Terror is the Weapon of Mass Distraction. Read it here. Greg Palast’s investigative reports appear on the BBC, […]

There’s a £50 fee to be in the Manchester Pride parade this year

Quicktime version here

If you want to take part in Manchester’s annual gay pride parade this year you will have to pay £50 + VAT. No, this isn’t a fee for businesses — they already pay more than £1000 to be in the parade.

Rocketbust: the question the articles never asked about Rocketboom

Andrew Baron, the creator and producer of the videoblog show Rocketboom, and Amanda Congdon its star, have parted company according to reports.

In all the hype that surrounds Rocketboom there is one question that has always gone unanswered.

The BBC, public participation and ‘user generated’ content

How serious is the BBC about public participation and user-generated content? Not very serious, I would say…

The BBC has always looked on the public as material to be used in its programmes and now looks on photographs and videos that come from that public as material to be used in it programmes. Not much change…