HOME > NEWS & COMMENT
Welcome to G7uk.com
 

 
 
Friday 6 October 2006

Wounded British TV reporter was shot dead by US troops

‘ITN reporter Terry Lloyd was shot in the head by American troops as he was being driven to hospital, the inquest into his death was told…’. The Guardian.

Full story here.


Filed under: Politics,The media,TV & film — GS @ 1:47 pm

The Daily Telegraph gets it wrong

In its obituary for Jennifer Moss, who played Lucille Hewitt in Coronation Street, The Daily Telegraph repeatedly refers to ‘Grampian Television’ instead of Granada.

Granada Television not Grampian

What a mistake to make about one of the most famous television programmes of all time from probably the most famous ITV company. Doesn’t the Telegraph have sub-editors?

How can you trust a publication that is wrong about something as basic as this and doesn’t notice?

It alarms me just how often I see factual errors like this on subjects I know something about. I’ve spotted a few in The Independent newspaper over recent months. And the obvious question is, how many mistakes are there in articles about subjects I know nothing about?


Filed under: The media — GS @ 12:47 pm
Wednesday 13 September 2006

When cows attack (video)

I had an eventful five hour walk this afternoon. This is a short extract from a much longer video that I’ll be making about it.

I’m laughing about this but, with a calf on the track ahead of me, I wasn’t sure whether angry mum and dad and all their friends might be able to get out the field if they reached the corner before me.

There have been a few cases of walkers being trampled to death by cattle. Especially when there are calves: BBC report.

(Peter says: ‘get back to the city centre!’)


Filed under: Environment,Wildlife,With video — GS @ 11:32 pm
Wednesday 23 August 2006

Here Come the Double Deckers

One of my favourite TV programmes as a kid.

As far as I can make out, this series has never been released on video or DVD in the UK (and probably not in the US either). The last time I remember it being on terrestrial TV here was in the Granada ITV region in 1990.

This is one of a vast number of British television programmes and films that remain unseen, languishing in a vault somewhere. There are British films that I’ve never been able to watch and there is no way to see them because they are not available anywhere.

As a content producer myself I understand the need for copyright. But, is it right that companies can deny us access to our cultural heritage and prevent us from viewing these for decades? Simply because they can’t be bothered, or can’t make a profit by releasing them.

There should be some way for people to see these. Either require the companies to make a copy available that people can borrow from a local library. Or make it legal to share non-profit copies of commercially unavailable material.


Filed under: TV & film — GS @ 11:02 pm
Friday 11 August 2006

Almost a third of Americans (30%) can’t remember what year 9/11 was

Almost a third of Americans (30%) can’t remember what year 9/11 happened

They should have called it 9112001. But, if they had, 30% of Americans would have thought it happened in Beverly Hills :-D


Filed under: Fun — GS @ 11:57 pm
Tuesday 8 August 2006

A great spotted woodpecker outside my window (video)

Currently I’m in a little village near the England/Scotland border.

At 6am on Friday morning there seemed to be a lot of bird noise outside the window. I looked out and saw a crowd of sparrows and a male great spotted woodpecker (I know that because I looked it up on the RSPB website)

The first woodpecker I’ve seen in real-life. I was rather excited. The window has that old-fashioned glass, which is why the video is a bit blurred.


Filed under: Environment,Wildlife,With video — GS @ 6:15 pm
Thursday 6 July 2006

Rocketbust: the question the articles never asked about Rocketboom

Andrew Baron, the creator and producer of the videoblog show Rocketboom, and Amanda Congdon its star, have parted company according to reports.

In all the hype that surrounded Rocketboom in its first year online, there was one question that always went unanswered.

Print articles and TV reports were in awe of the show. Breathlessly, they told us how it was produced in an ordinary living room, had a quarter of a million viewers each day and yet cost just $20-$50 to make. Some even suggested that the main expense was photographic light-bulbs.

Andrew, the creator and producer of Rocketboom, was quoted as saying he spent some 8-14 hours making each five-minute episode. Which will be no surprise to anyone who has been involved in the time-consuming business of making television programmes or video.

But, as they predicted a rash of ‘user-generated’ Rocketboom-style programmes coming to a website near you, what none of these ‘anyone can do it’ reports ever asked, was how did the people behind Rocketboom pay the rent and buy food?

It was clear that making Rocketboom was a full-time job. After a year, I began to wonder. Did Rocketboom have a financial backer who had given them start-up cash? Was Andrew a rich-kid who didn’t have to worry about earning a living? Were they all on welfare?

Of course money isn’t everything, but eventually it became clear they did want to earn an income from the show.

As a video blog, Rocketboom has been a spectacular success. A phenomenon and I wholeheartedly congratulate Andrew and Amanda on what they did. But, as a business, it represents a missed opportunity of quite staggering proportions. I read they made about $80,000 from the one ad they had so far.

To be running for eighteen months, with 300,000 viewers per day, five days per week, and make only that, is just mind-boggling. With Google ads you can make $500 a year from a website that only gets 50 visitors a day…

History is littered with the tales of people who had great ideas or creativity, but failed to do what was necessary to turn those into an income. Rocketboom gave away its product under a creative commons licence. Its website and show usually carried no ads. It seems to me that the only valuable asset is the ‘brand’ and Amanda Congdon is a huge part of that.

Now the bubble has burst. Occasionally Rocketboom was brilliant (Amanda dancing in Russia), but often it was a bit too off-the-wall and left us scratching our heads in bemusement. Andrew was an expert on the RSS distribution side of things, with the result that Rocketboom was the first to make it big. It was a novelty and highly popular for that reason. That iconic combination of Amanda and the map… They captured a moment in time and I fear that moment is now over.

If I was Amanda, I would start making a new online show right now while she is so much in the public eye. If I was Andrew, I would sell the Rocketboom show, archives (which don’t have a lot of value because they are so topical) and domain name and split the money with Amanda, while they still have the chance to make some money from this. Otherwise Rocketboom is going to begin a slow fade into history without making either of them rich.

The worst thing would be to get tied up in a legal case for several years, by which time there will be nothing left to carve up. Time is of the essence for both of them…


Filed under: Net & technology — GS @ 11:17 am
 
< PREVIOUS  |  NEXT >
 
 
News & Comment


 
< PREVIOUS  |  NEXT >
 
 
 

Audio Buildings Bygone Manc Computing consumer Crime Documentary Environment Food & cookery Fun g7uktalk Gay General Health History LGBT Manchester Net & technology Personal Photography Politics Production Rushes Science Shopping software Strange The media TV & film Video-making Wildlife With video

 
xx
HOME > NEWS & COMMENT
 
Home
 

© Copyright g7uk.com 1999-2016